http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1426331907/Welcome.jpg

to Mr. Shamblin's Gifted Personal Portfolio for EGT 580 Cleveland State University and continued research/information related to the field of Gifted Education.

 

(This portfolio will contain information about each Professional Standard (with artifacts for download and viewing purposes) along with an Introduction and Overall Reflection to the Personal Portfolio)

You will also find information on Gifted Resources, Lesson Plans and much more below!

 


 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1376674842/new-arrow.png~UPDATES ADDED BELOW~

 

 

READ THESE ARTICLES:

 

GIFTED STUDENTS Here's how one district is deploying robots to embody concepts in science, math, ELA and social studies. By Cheri DiMartino

https://digital.1105media.com/THEJournal/2017/THE_1706/files/basic-html/page24.html

Ohio's Gifted Accountability System: Good Start But We Aren't There Yet  https://highability.wordpress.com/2016/09/02/ohios-gifted-accountability-system-good-start-but-we-arent-there-yet/

 

 

 

New links added to the Gifted Resources

 

 The Young Gifted Child: A Guide for Families http://kingofalltechnology.com/youngchildgifted.pdf

Great Potential Press Guiding Gifted Children and Adults (browse through books to purchase, gifted links and much more) http://www.greatpotentialpress.com/ 

 

Smart Board Games (Hoagies' Gifted Education Page)

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/smart_board_games.htm

48 Essential Links for the Parents of Gifted Children

http://oedb.org/ilibrarian/50-essential-links-for-the-parents-of-gifted-children/ 

Brain Boosters

http://school.discoveryeducation.com/brainboosters/ 

***DARE TO DIFFERENTIATE***

http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/

 

 

Feel free to email me if you have additional links that you would like added to the Gifted Resources Page!

 


 

http://www.mrshamblin.com

 

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1353330489/portfolio.png

 

 

You can email me at mikesmarbles@yahoo.com

 

 

 

Introductory Reflection to Personal Portfolio

 

Michael Shamblin

Introductory Reflection

EGT 580

 

This Online Personal Portfolio is a culmination of past courses in Gifted Education at Cleveland State University and their relationship to the standards.  The gifted courses that I had taken at Cleveland State: EGT 512 Nature and Developmental Needs, EGT 513 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment, EGT 517 Creativity, Inquiry, and Productive Thinking and EGT 518 Working with Students, Families, and Professionals of Gifted Students.  Within each of the 10 National Association for Gifted Children CEC Teacher Knowledge and Skill Standards for Gifted and Talented Education I respond with overall comments for progress toward the overall standard.  In addition, I listed courses that helped master the individual standard and any artifacts that showed that I mastered it.  Artifacts consisted of major projects, for example, a Case Study on a Gifted Child, a research paper that is titled Technologically Gifted Child, Differentiated Lesson Plans and much more.  A rating of subcategories is also listed in which I evaluated each subcategory within the standard.  I am very excited to have this opportunity to put together an online personal portfolio that highlights what I had learned and continued professional growth with working with gifted children, parents, and stakeholders.

Attached is the Professional Development Standards Assignment and within each of the standards I have an artifact if one is listed for the individual subcategory.  

 

Shamblin Professional Standards Assignment 2013 NEW Portfolio.pdf

 

  

Standard #1: Foundations (EGT 512, 517, 518, 580)

 

K 1 

History of Gifted Education.pdf

 

 

K 2
Look Below the Website

Technology Gifted Child Research Paper

 

Interpersonal.pdf EGT 517

 

 

K 3

ShamblinMichaelIdealvsReality.pdf EGT 518


HB_555_Changes_to_Gifted.pdf EGT 580

 

 

K 4

Shamblin_Michael_Arent All Children Gifted.pdf EGT 512

 

 

K 5

Growing Up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School / Edition 7 by Barbara Clark. 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359738152/growing%20up%20gifted.JPG

 

K 6

Shamblin_Michael_Excellence v. Equity.pdf EGT 512

 

 

K 7

Shamblin_Michael_Diversity.pdf EGT 512

 

 

 

 

Standard #2: Development and Characteristics of Learners (EGT 512)

 

K 1

Shamblin Michael Cognitive and Affective.pdf EGT 512

 

 

K 2

Growing Up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School / Edition 7 by Barbara Clark

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359738152/growing%20up%20gifted.JPG

 

 

K 3

Shamblin_Michael_Parents.pdf EGT 512

 

 

K 4

Early signs of giftedness.pdf EGT 512

 

 

K 5

 

Growing Up Gifted: Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School / Edition 7 by Barbara Clark

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359738152/growing%20up%20gifted.JPG

 

Standard #3: Individual Learning Differences (EGT 512, 517, 518)

 

K 1

The diverse profile of the extremely gifted child.pdf EGT 512

 

K 2

Standard 3 K2 Academic and Affective Characteritics and learnng needs.pdf EGT 518

 

K 3

Shamblin_Michael_Asynchronous Development.pdf EGT 512

 

K 4

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359638544/parenting%20gifted%20children.JPG

 

S 1

Shamblin_Michael_Wiki Assignment Freud.pdf EGT 517

 

Standard #4: Instructional Strategies (EGT 513, 517)

 

K 1

Books on Differentiation.pdf EGT 513

 

K 2

Check below Website

Project: Designing an elementary classroom to encourage creativity among students

 

Michael Shamblin, 4th grade Regular or Self Contained Gifted Education Classroom

 

 

S 1

7 lesson plans using various strategies EGT 517

 

S 2

 

Check below Website

 

S 3

Check below Website

 

S 4

Unit Plan on the Ohio and Erie Canal EGT 513

 

S 5

Check below Website

 

 

S 6

7 lesson plans using various strategies EGT 517

 

 

S 7

Focused Investigation Research Paper with Research and Personal Experiences in Educating Students with Computer Technology (EGT 513 Curriculum, Teaching Strategies, Differentiated Instruction and Evaluations)

 

 

Standard #5: Learning Environments and Social Interactions (EGT 512, 517, 580)

 

K 1

Gifted Stereotype.pdf EGT 580 (Wait a minute or two to download)

 

K 2

 

Interpersonal.pdf EGT 517

 

S 1

EGT 580 ShamblinGiftedLesson1.pdf

 

 

S 2

Check below Website

 

S 3

Shamblin_Michael_Creativity.pdf EGT 512

 

 

S 4

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359638518/multicultural-gifted-education%20book.jpg

 

 

S 5

HildaTabaTeachngStrategies.pdf EGT 517

 

Standard #6: Language and Communication (EGT 518)

 

K 1

Shamblin Parent Letter Prezi.pdf

 

K 2

Professional Development Assignment (Check Below Website)

Shamblin Michael Professional Development Module UPDATED.pdf

 

K 3

No Artifact

 

S 1

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org

 

S 2

Professional Development Assignment (Check Below Website)

Shamblin Michael Professional Development Module UPDATED.pdf

 

 

 

 

Standard #7: Instructional Planning (EGT 513, 517, 518)

 

K 1

Guilford.pdf EGT 517

 

K 2

No Artifact

 

K 3

ShamblinMichaelChoiceBoardViewfromSatRedo.pdf EGT 513

 

S 1

ShamblinMichaelViewfromSatLessonPlan.pdf EGT 513

 

S 2

Unit Plan on the Ohio and Erie Canal EGT 513

 

S 3

K-12 programming standards.pdf EGT 518

 

S 4

No Artifact

 

S 5

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1296325334/book1.jpg http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1296325344/book2.jpg http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1296325351/book3.jpg

 

S 6

No Artifact

 

 

Standard #8: Assessment (EGT 512, 513, 517, 580)

 

K 1

Shamblin_Michael_Identification_Assessment.pdf EGT 512

 

K 2

Shamblin_Michael_Torrance_Test.pdf EGT 517

 

 

K 3

Alternative Assessment Strategies.pdf EGT 580

 

S 1

Shamblin_Michael_Discover Assessment.pdf EGT 512

 

 

S 2

Assessment Instruments Cleveland Schools.pdf EGT 512

 

S 3

ShamblinMichaelViewfromSatPreTest-2.pdf EGT 513

 

S 4

Shamblin_Michael_Torrance_Test.pdf EGT 517

 

 

 

 

Standard #9: Professional and Ethical Practice (EGT 512, 518, 580)

 

K 1

Shamblin_Michael_Philosophy Revised.pdf EGT 512

 

K 2

National Association for Gifted Children https://www.nagc.org/ 

 

S 1

No Artifact

 

S 2

Shamblin Michael WEP FINAL.pdf EGT 518

 

S 3

Shamblin_Michael_Case Study.pdf EGT 512

 

S 4

Application for Menlo Park Academy School Computer Club.pdf EGT 580

 

S 5

Shamblin Michael HQPD.pdf EGT 518

 

S 6

 http://javits.escco.org/ Online Professional Development

 

S 7

Shamblin Michael Advocacy SUPT.pdf EGT 518

 

 

Michael Shamblin

Overall Reflection

EGT 580

 

After completing my Online Personal Portfolio, I found this to be a challenging task to put together previous assignments within each of the standards.  I was able to find many artifacts and some artifacts were online discussions that students had to contribute to blackboard including myself.  I was fortunate to save all of my personal files, but I wanted to make sure that files transferred correctly and links worked properly.  I wanted to create something that I can show to future employers and to highlight what I had learned.  I was not able to excel with every standard and some I felt that I needed improvement, but many subcategories I believe that I demonstrated mastery.  As I continue to gain additional experience with gifted students, I strongly believe that I will master the subcategories.  In addition, with new research, I will be able to implement and use new instructional strategies to benefit gifted and talented students in the near future. 

 


 

 

Parallel Curriculum Model

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1299348740/PicassoPicture.JPG

 

 

Michael Shamblin

Parallel Curriculum Model

EGT 513

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

            In this Wikispace project, the parallel curriculum model will be researched.  This includes providing my extensive research along with any articles, website links, PowerPoint projects, that will allow for further understanding of the research topic.  “The parallel curriculum model is an integrated framework and set of procedures for designing rigorous and highly motivating curriculum that attends to important student differences” (Parallel Curriculum Model (PCM), 2011, p.1).  Information in regards to an overview of the parallel curriculum model, and an in depth look at each of the parallels, will be given on the model.

 

Overview of the Parallel Curriculum Model

 

            The parallel curriculum model allows for challenging curriculum using one, two, three, or four “parallel” ways in thinking about course content.  Parallel does not mean that the approaches should remain separate our isolated from one another.  The parallel curriculum model can be used singly, or in combination, to create or revise existing curriculum units, lessons, or tasks.  All curriculum takes its basic definition from what the model calls “The Core Curriculum” as experts in that discipline conceive and practice it.  A second parallel “The Curriculum of Connections” expands on the Core Curriculum and allows students to make connections within or across different disciplines.  The third parallel is the “Curriculum of Practice,” this guides the learners in the facts, principles, concepts that they are trying to understand in ways that allow for student growth.  The fourth parallel is “The Curriculum of Identity” and this guides students to understanding their own strengths, values, preferences and

personal reflection (Tomlinson, 2002).

 

In Depth look at each of the Parallels

 

            The Core Curriculum is defined as the nature of a given discipline.  The ultimate goal of the core curriculum is for students to gain the knowledge, understanding, and skills in a specific subject area.  The use of national, state, or local standards should be used to educate students in your school/district.  The core or basic curriculum is built on key facts, concepts, and principles.  Additionally, this promotes understanding rather than rote learning and results in evidence of worthwhile student production.  All students should work with a core curriculum, but as students demonstrate advanced talent those students need to work at higher levels.  This includes using more advanced reading, resources, and research materials.  Working at greater levels of depth, designing tasks that are more open ended, developing rubrics with expert level indicators, and encouraging student work with reflection.

 

            The Nature of the Curriculum Connections helps students to discover the interconnectedness of knowledge.  This builds on the core curriculum and emphasizes key facts, concepts, and extends on the core curriculum.  This allows students to see connections in other disciplines.  Having the students explore connections between art, social studies, history, reading and language arts, helps build a greater amount of knowledge.  The curriculum connections help students to discover key ideas in multiple contexts and examine their similarities and differences.  Students can use ideas and information from one context and ask questions in another context.  Students can develop an awareness of multiple perspectives on different issues and problems and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches (Tomlinson, 2002). 

 

            The Nature of the Curriculum of Practice helps students extend their understandings and skills much like those of a professional in that area or field.  This model guides the student in the journey from novice to an expert.  Engaging in the work of professionals along with examining the habits, and ethics of their work.  Students have the ability to learn more when the doing takes on the nature of the area of work.  Curriculum of practice might ask students to function as a scholar and developing an appreciation for the individuals that are experts in the areas.  The curriculum of practice helps students to experience learning in context along with expanding their experiences in the field.  Students are able to identify problems in the field, and to think about ways to act on the problems.  Additionally the ability to monitor their thinking and problem solving strategies and using resources in the field to help them is important. 

 

            The Nature of the Curriculum of Identity extends the core curriculum.  This allows students to think about themselves, their goals, and to make a connection to their world.  This model allows students to explore in depth the nature of the particular disciplines as how the disciplines relate to their own lives.  This parallel helps students to think about “how their lives are shaped by the discipline, challenges, and conflicts that may exists in a field and what it means for a person to be both represent and be represented by a chosen field” (Tomlinson, 2002, p.35).  The goals of the curriculum of identity helps students to sample the diciplines in order to understand themselves in relation to it.  Students can recognize connections between their own cultural heritage and the evolution of the field.  Additionally, students can reflect on an identify their skills, interest, and talents in relating to one or more disciplines.  They can understand the excitement that people in a discipline have about ideas and problems (Tomlinson, 2002). 

 

 

Pros and Cons of the Model

 

PROS:

 If the curriculum is effective, it is a panacea

 

CONS:   

Steep Learning Curve

Time to learn and work with the model 

Time for planning

 

 

Key Terminology

 

Parallel - Moving in the same general direction

 

Curriculum - a combination of aims and objectives, content, experiences, outcome and processes of an educational program

 

Model - plan or create according to a model or models

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

            In conclusion, I had provided research on the parallel curriculum model in regards to an overview of the parallel curriculum model, an in depth look at each of the parallels.  In addition, I am adding PowerPoint slide show projects that I found on the topic along with other research

and multimedia. 

 

Works Cited

 

     Parallel Curriculum Model (PCM). (2011, January 29). Retrieved January 29, 2011, from National Association For Gifted Children: http://www.nagc.org/index.aspx?id=1069

      Tomlinson, C. A. (2002). The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop High Potential and Challenge . California: Corwin Press, INC.

 


 

Youtube Video on Parallel Curriculum Model

 

Dr. Rebecca Hayes of the University of Mary Washington College of Graduate and Professional Studies discusses the parallel curriculum.

 

 


Parallel Curriculum PowerPoint Projects that I found on the Internet

 

I found the following PowerPoint Projects on Parallel Curriculum that contain accurate information on the model.  I did extensive searches to find these files, but they do not contain any authors who had created them. 

 

The PowerPoint files formatted for use with Microsoft PowerPoint

Parallel_Curriculum_Model_Good.ppt Overview of PCM Module 1-2.ppt

The PowerPoint files formatted for use with Adobe Reader

Parallel_Curriculum_Model_Good-1.pdf Overview of PCM Module 1-2-1.pdf

 

 


Research Articles where Parallel Curriculum is mentioned

 

Curriculum for Highly Able Learners That Conforms to General Education and Gifted Education Quality Indicators By Jessica A. Hockett University of Virginia ParallelCurriculum1.pdf

 

The Parallel Curriculum Model (PCM): The Whole Story By Jeanne H. Purcell, PhD, Deborah E. Burns, PhD & Jann H. Leppien, PhD PCM Artcl.pdf

 


Links and other information on Parallel Curriculum

 

The Parallel Curriculum model being used at Sky Vista Middle Schools Aurora Co  http://www.cherrycreekschools.org/schools/skyvista/AboutUs/Pages/default.aspx

 

Example of a Math Lesson involving use of Parallel Model Exploring_Mathematical_Relationships_Unit.pdf

 


 

Books available for purchase on Parallel Curriculum

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1296325334/book1.jpg http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1296325344/book2.jpg http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1296325351/book3.jpg

To find out more information about how to purchase these books, check out the links below:

http://www.nagc.org/index.aspx?id=1069  http://www.amazon.com (I suggest an online store such as amazon.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333453394/creative%20classrooms.JPG

 

Project: Designing an elementary classroom to encourage creativity among students

 

Michael Shamblin, 4th grade Regular or Self Contained Gifted Education Classroom

 

 

            Psychological safety according to Starko requires that every child in your room feels accepted, important, and valued.  “Psychological safety is associated with three processes: acceptance of the individual, lack of external evaluation, and empathetic understanding” (Starko, 2010, p.244).  In an elementary 4th grade regular (mixed or various ability) or gifted education classroom, it is important to accept all children as having unconditional worth.  Children need to be seen as having value and potential.  Children need to be exposed to a teacher that expresses warmth in a caring and nurturing environment much like a family.  Rules and clear consequences are enforced however, when behavior is not accepted the child still feels accepted and is treated with respect.  Lack of external evaluation needs to be implemented in an elementary classroom.  Elementary teacher’s need to provide feedback and information on behaviors and ideas without having students believe that the only valid sources of evaluation are outside of themselves.  Additionally, empathetic understanding needs to be used in the classroom in which we must learn enough about our students so we can see the world through their eyes.  More information about how to create a psychologically safe classroom can be found on this website http://www.ehow.com/how_7872445_create-psychologically-safe-classroom.html

 

            In incorporating Amabile's theories of motivation into my elementary classroom, Starko discusses her research extensively; intrinsic motivation is supportive of creativity.  “Some types of extrinsic motivation are harmful to creativity, some are not” (Starko, 2010, p.248).  Amabile’s book, Growing Up Creative explains how she discussed that the standard tools we have relied on for so long in parenting and teaching – evaluation, reward, competition, and restriction of choice – can in fact destroy creativity; we must perform a balancing act.  It is important to use enough constraint to give children a sense of predictability, but not so much that children feel the only reason they are doing something is that they have to.  The trick is to set limits in a way that maintain their intrinsic motivation, (Amabile, p.79).  Amabile’s research has shown that controlling classrooms reduce intrinsic motivation.  Rules in an elementary classroom should be presented informationally.  Children should be given a behavioral constraint along with a good reason for the constraint and an acknowledgement that they might not be enthusiastic about obeying, without a lot of controlling language.  It is important to focus grading and evaluation on “what did you learn” and not “how did you do” and let children participate in evaluating their own work.  Make it informational rather than controlling. 

 

            “In flow, a person is so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter” (Starko, 2010, p.255).  Csikszentmihalyi explains that flow is the state in which “people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it” (Starko, 2010, p.254).  When working with elementary students, a central theme in good classroom management is the idea of activity flow.  Lessons with a good flow keep students’ attention and are less likely to offer opportunities for disruptive behavior because most of the cues for students are directed toward behaviors appropriate for the lesson.  When lesson flow is choppy, this will allow greater tendency for students to go off task and for discipline problems to arise.  Productive activity flow in an elementary classroom should be maintained through three types of teacher practices or behaviors: preventing misbehavior, managing lesson movement, and maintaining group focus and accountability.  An elementary teacher should understand that it is much easier for students to take in information if the material is meaningful, useful, interesting, fun, or has emotional relevance.  It is important to teach lessons using the Flow Learning format and you should implement this into math, science, social studies, language, and even art classes.  Sometimes with elementary students, a simple action like wearing a costume or playing special music can be enough to pique students’ interest and awaken their enthusiasm.  It is important for elementary teachers to incorporate games and unexpected surprises into various lessons. 

 

            In designing independent work with elementary students, it is important to make sure that you teach students how to work independently and to learn important independent work skills.  This includes teaching lessons that involve a topic such as becoming independent, uses of independent work time, or choice activities, and what to do when tasks are completed.  At the intermediate levels, students can work on independent projects for possibly five days.  Students should be taught to schedule their time to complete these projects, and that many routes are possible as long as the goal is reached.  According to Starko, two of the most common ways to implement independent learning activities are with the use of centers and contracts.  It is important to decide on an important topic for your learning center, for example, weather.  Materials need to be gathered such as books, websites, computer software etc. and then activities need to created that relate to data gathering, problem solving, individual research etc.  For example, students will access Internet resources to create a set of 20 Fact or Fiction Cards all related to Weather.  Using a Microsoft Word template, students will create statements and provide an online resource to be used for confirming or disconfirming the statement <Fact Fiction>.  Contracts will provide a structure for a student and teacher to agree on a series of tasks to be completed in a given time frame.  Starko on pg. 265 offers a nice example of an Independent Learning Contract, the contract should consist of open-ended activities based on student interest and those emphasizing problem finding, problem solving, and an expression of creative ideas.  Independent learning overall needs to be promoted in classrooms.  Students need to be offered choices, set learning goals, use authentic texts, possibly involve learners in lesson planning, encourage learners to keep learner diaries, and build reflection and extension into activities. 

 

            In extending this further, Tim Bedley has been teaching elementary school students for over 21 years.  This video shows a little glimpse of how he trains his students to work independently on correcting their math assignments each day.  Tim as developed a system called “Reaching Consensus” where students compare and then modify their answers each day through debate/discussion in pairs.  View this video to see how this is used http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElrrXHai5CA.  I also found a nice document that discusses “How to Create and Use Learning Contracts” on the internet, although, you can find more resources online.  http://www.fcpsteach.org/docs/directions-learning%20contracts.pdf In addition, I found a nice article that was written by Kathryn Walsh, eHow Contributor that is titled How to Encourage Creativity in the Classroom.  She discussed activities that can help each child build self-esteem and that can express personality.  http://www.ehow.com/how_7793603_encourage-creativity-classroom.html I love the idea that she mentions that you need to read books every day.  Include books about fairy tales and science fiction to get students imaginations moving.  Perform each book while you read it and use hand movements and props.  It is important to create a different voice for each character as well. 

 

Resources

 

Amabile, T. (1992). Growing Up Creative. Creative Education Foundation.

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333453427/growingupcreative.jpg

 

 

Starko, A.J. (2010). Creativity in the classroom: Schools of curious delight (4th ed.) New York: Routledge.

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333453454/creativity%20in%20the%20classroom.jpg


Jennifer Schneider - Middle School Gifted Language Arts Classroom

  

Ensuring Psychological Safety

     The following points are suggested by Starko (2010) and Piirto (2011):

 

1. Accept the individual.

          Students must be seen as having value and potential.  Learn students' names quickly, encourage full classroom

          participation by calling on shyer students, and greet students every day individually by name. Be willing to examine

          student ideas, even when they initially appear strange or inappropriate.  Employ Taba's strategy of recording

          student ideas on the board, no matter what.

 

2. Allow for internal evaluation.

          Have students use their own judgement to determine the ultimate worth of a creative product.  Require self-

          evaluations following the submission of all major assignments.

 

3. Provide empathetic understanding.

          Accept not only who the student appears to be, but also who he/she is inside.  Be available.  Get to know the

          students--their likes and dislikes.  Be interested in them personally.

 

4. Provide private workspace.

          Encourage private work time as well as group/collaborative work.  Value the students' options to work alone. 

          Provide spaces for students to choose to work alone: desks, beanbags, "thinking corners", etc.

 

5. Avoid sex-role stereotypes.

          Do not always view girls as soft and nurturing and boys as hard and athletic.  Allow for and encourage gender

          crossover.

 

6. Allow oddity.

          Positively reinforce thinking that is outside the box.  Display these kinds of ideas and products.  Post student quotes

          throughout the year on the walls with their permission.

 

Amabile's Theory of Motivation

 

1. Evaluation

          Ask questions such as, "What did you learn?" or "Which parts can help you learn more?" rather than statements

          such as, "Good job!" or "Try harder."

 

2. Reward

          Provide unexpected rewards rather than stated rewards that make students think the reward is more important

          than the creative process (e.g. positive calls home). 

 

3. Choice

          Allow students to have a choice of products, processes (working individually or in groups), creating class rules, etc.

 

Flow

 

1. Provide activities that are goal-directed.  Students must know what benchmarks are expected and when they've achieved them.

 

2. Provide an optimal match between challenge and skill.  Differentiate!  Provide extension activities and opportunities for students who have already achieved skill mastery.

 

3. Allow for learning opportunities that encourage students to become "lost" in teh material: uninterrupted reading time, self-exploration, interest-based activities, etc.

 

Independent Learning

 

1. Provide clear instruction of tasks to be completed at the beginning of an activity with benchmarks for students to self-monitor progress.

 

2. State expectations for assistance: students are not to sit idle while waiting for help. They must provide three documented options they've exhausted before coming to the teacher (e.g. asking a peer, looking up the answer in notes/texts, researching online, etc.).

 

3. At an activity's beginning, students must know what materials are available and be able to use them cooperatively.

 

4. Use learning contracts.  Prior to a research paper or investigative activity, students will fill out a pre-made contract similar to that on p. 265 of Starko's text. that includes the subject being investigated, materials to be used, product to be created, and deadlines for each broken-down task, signed by both the student and the teacher.

 

Helpful Hints

 

 

References

 

Piirto, J.  (2011).  Creativity for 21st century skills: How to embed creativity into the curriculum. Rotterdam: The

     Netherlands.  Sense Publishers.

 

Starko, A.  (2010).  Creativity in the classroom: Schools of curious delight (4th ed.).  New York, NY: Routledge. 

 

 

 

Intrapersonal Intelligence

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333454308/intrapersonal.jpg

 

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1.  Distinguishing characteristics, abilities, or skills of an individual who is highly creative in this particular MI;

 

            Howard Gardener, in his book “Frames of Mind” defines Intrapersonal Intelligence as sensitivity to our own feelings, our own wants and fears, our own personal histories, awareness of our own strengths and weaknesses, plans and goals (Gardner, 1993).  This individual has the understanding of oneself.  These individuals like working alone and following their instincts as well as pursuing their own interests and goals (Intrapersonal Intelligence).  The following skills are those that exhibit an individual with Intrapersonal Intelligence.  These individuals are likely to be skilled at one or more of the following  

 

 

 

2.  Examples of the types of careers individuals with a strength in this MI would engage and the names of well-known individuals and/or historic figures who are well known for their acumen in this MI;

 

            The intrapersonal intelligence individual may find a career in areas such as a poet, artist, photographer, or therapist, theologian, program planner and counselor.  Philosophers, authors, artist, psychotherapists, and many solitary individuals in many vocations have this type of intelligence.  Famous people that who are well known for their acumen in this multiple intelligence: Aristotle, Helen Keller, George Patton, or Anne Frank (Intrapersonal Intelligence). 

 

3.  An example of how you would adapt a lesson, unit, assignment, or assessment to engage students in utilizing and developing this particular MI;

 

Students can keep a diary/journal about what they are learning each day and describe what it means to them.  Additionally, students can write reflections on topics studied in class. 

 

Students can create an alternate ending for a story they hear in class.  Then discuss their endings, what differences occurred and if the "moral" of the story changed. 

 

Technologies that stimulate this intelligence:

 

Journals, diaries, surveys, voting machines, learning centers, children's literature, class discussion, real time projects, online surveys, online forms, digital portfolios, self-assessments.

 

 

Works Cited

 

Inspiring Breakthrough Multiple Intelligences. (2005). Retrieved February 13, 2012, from Inspiring Breakthrough Developing Individuals and Teams: http://www.inspiring-breakthrough.co.uk/learning-styles/intrapersonal-learning.htm

 

Gardner, H. (1993). Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: BasicBooks.

 

Intrapersonal Intelligence. (n.d.). Retrieved February 13, 2012, from Intrapersonal Intelligence: http://www.angelfire.com/mi3/intrapersonal/

 

 

"Intrapersonal: Possible Careers - FamilyEducation.com." School Resources & Educational Help By Grade & Subject For Parents - FamilyEducation.com. Web. 16 Feb. 2012. <http://school.familyeducation.com/child-based-learning/careers/38496.html>.

 

 

 

 

EGT 517 Creativity Resources

 

 


 

 

1. Michael Shamblin

 

Title: Creativity and Play: Fostering Creativity

Sponsor or author of the website: Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)

URL: http://www.pbs.org/wholechild/parents/play.html

 

When clicking on and viewing the site on creativity, you will notice that there is an article titled "Creativity and Play: Fostering Creativity".  The article describes what creativity is along with information on opportunities for creativity, fostering the creative process, and much more.  The website also offers dos and don'ts and what you can do at home with creativity.  Creativity is defined as the "freest form of self-expression and for children the creative process is more important than the finished product".

                                       

Title: Creativity

Sponsor or author of the website: Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)

URL: http://www.pbs.org/thisemotionallife/topic/creativity/creativity

 

When clicking on and viewing the site on creativity, you will notice that there are three sections titled What is creativity, Nurturing your creativity, and Common Misconceptions.  As a bonus on the very bottom of the page you will notice that there are additional resources that you can click on for more information about creativity.  Is it possible that happy emotions can boost creativity, find out by reading that article from abcnews.com.  Creativity is defined as the ability to generate new ideas and new connections between ideas, and ways to solve problems in any field or realm of our lives.

 

 

I also would like to add this additional link that you can find many additional websites on creativity:

 http://ozpk.tripod.com/000create 

 

 


 

2. Devin Stang 

 

 

Title: Creativity Matters

 Sponsor or Author of the Website: Ozgur

URL: http://creativitymattersproject.blogspot.com/2010/03/word-creativity-has-variety-of-meanings.html 

 

 

Clicking this site will take you to three definitions of creativity ranging from simple (the state or quality of being creative) to more interesting.  This site would be valuable to teachers as it talks about how to spot creativity and how teachers can promote creativity.  Also included are tips on how to assess creativity (very difficult) - examining the child as a whole is discussed at length when considering such assessments.

 

Title: Iowa State University Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching

Sponsor or Author of the Website: CELT staff

http://www.celt.iastate.edu/creativity/defining.html

 

Clicking this site will take you to Iowa State University's Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching.  The page will contain a definition of creativity - A mental activity performed in situations where there is no prior correct solution or answer.  The site contains elements of creativity and how they blend together.  Also included are ways to foster creativity including an interesting portion on "Heuristics" - techniques for creative thinking and generating ideas.  Also included in the site are three videos the first one in particular explains how creatvity is a learnable skill (worth watching).

 


 

3. Abigail Schlarb 

 

Title: On Defining Creativity

Sponsor/Author: California State University, Northridge

URL: http://www4.uwsp.edu/education/lwilson/creativ/define.htm   

Description: at this link, it will take you to the link on the homepage titled Defining creativity.  Here you will find multiple definitions, uses as a metaphor, other perspectives on creativity, and information about how creative work consists of the application and melding of three types of thinking, all of which they contend can be learned or enhanced.  If you click back to the home page, you can find a wealth of resources on creativity.

Definition of creativity: 10 definitions are listed from various resources.  Check link to view. First definition listed: Creativity is marked by the ability or power to createto bring into existence, to invest with a new form, to produce through imaginative skill, to make or bring into existence something new. 

 

  

Title: Creativity at Work: Articles and Tips

Author: Linda Naiman

URL: http://www.creativityatwork.com/articlesContent/whatis.htm

Description: On this website, the author defines creativity in comparison with other references, talks about creativity and economic development, creativity at work, strategies for creativity, myths about genius, and defining innovation.  It is more geared towards implementing creativity in the business workspace, but has lots of interesting, easily readable information.

Definition of creativity:  creativity is the act of turning new and imaginative ideas into reality. Creativity involves two processes: thinking, then producing. Innovation is the production or implementation of an idea. If you have ideas, but don't act on them, you are imaginative but not creative.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

4. Kelley McLaughlin      

 

 

Title: What is Creativity:  http://www.is.wayne.edu/drbowen/crtvyw99/what_is.htm 

Sponsor: Wayne State University

This site describes the many aspects of creativity, describing the difference between a creative person, product, process and environment.  There is mention of controversies of creativity, asking questions like “is it possible to be creative in practical affairs?” to help get the reader to start thinking about creativity in many different ways.  One interesting topic mentioned here is the idea of a ‘dark side’ to creativity.   This focuses on the idea that being creative can mean also being out of control, somber and withdrawn. 

Definition of Creativity: Something is creative if it is new, and it meets a need or solves a problem.

 

Title: Introduction to Creative Thinking http://www.virtualsalt.com/crebook1.htm  Author: Robert Harris

This site focuses on creativity and creative thinking.  After defining creativity, the author describes negative thoughts that can block creativity which is beneficial to many people because it is very relatable and once read, may give new insight to the reader.  Later, the author also discusses positive attitudes that spur creativity, which also helps people think about how they think.  There are many descriptions of a creative person and then there are links to techniques on how to think creatively and many other topics that interest the same demographic. 

Definition of Creativity: An ability to imagine something new, an attitude to accept change and a process of continuously improving ideas.  

 

5.   Amanda Markley 

Title:  Ten classroom creativity killers

www.goshen.edu/art/ed/creativitykillers.html  Author :Marvin Bartel

This website does not give a claear defintion of creativity. It allows for you to question yourself as does the text to ask questions. This website focuses on what the teacher does everyday that doesn't allow for students to show their creativity. It also focuses on the problem-solving aspect of creativity as the text does. It also gives ideas on how to allow your students to be more creative in each classroom setting. This website gives some examples to help yourself be creative in your own classroom. I found that after reading, I "kill" creativity in my own classroom, and have some ideas to reinforce it.

 

Title:What is creativity

www.csun.edu/~vcpsy00h/creativity/define.htm Author: Robert E. Franken

Creativity is defined as the tendency to generate or recognize ideas, alternatives, or possibilities that may be useful in solving problems, communicating with others, and entertaining ourselves and others. This website talks about how you can become creative if you are already not. It tells you that you need to look at things through different eyes and in different ways. This site also shares characteristics of creative people and how to allow yourself to be more creative.

 

6.  LeAnn Carver

Title: Teaching Creativity

By: Marvin Bartel

http://people.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/arted/tc.html

 

This website is about teaching art, but there are many good ideas that can be used as guidelines for other core classes.  It talks about when students should have limitations and when they should be allowed freedom.  It also talks about the two sides of the brain and how they work when creating.  It also talks about how much instruction their should be.  Should you give them other works to copy or or other works to look at and how many is too much.

 

Title: TEACHING FOR CREATIVITY: TWO DOZEN TIPS

By: Robert Sternberg and Wendy M. Williams

http://www.cdl.org/resource-library/articles/teaching_creativity.php

 

The first part of this website is titled The Investment Theory of Creativity.  In the world of investment, people buy low (what they create) and sell high (convincing people it is creative and getting them to buy into it).  I think this is a very interesting way of looking at creativity.  The article then goes on to give 24 tips to creativity.  The tips that are given outline everything there is to know about teaching students to be creative.  There is so much to learn.

 

7.  Kevin Barre

 

Title:  Using Social Media to Define the New Humanities (powerpoint pres)

Author:  Antonio Vivo

URL: http://www.slideshare.net/antonioviva/using-social-media-to-define-the-new-humanities-classroom-presentation

Description:  This is a 23-slide powerpoint that explores the nature of Web 2.0 and how it can apply to engaging students interactively in the age of social networking.  While the definition of creativity is not specifically applied here, I believe it is extremely important to discuss this type of information in a modern educational creativity course.  Vivo moves through slides where he gives some reports of a research panel that had met.  He shows juxtaposes the 'old school' ideas of creative writing in the humanities, and then moves into the importance of enhancing interaction via social networking sites like facebook, wordpress, twitter, and the like.  There are a couple of links to various youtube videos and other supplemental things, as well.  Ultimately, why I choose this particular piece, is that I'd love to have discussion in this course surrounding the central definition of creativity, not just within a four-walled classroom, but also within a global, social community that we typically steer students away from....with the stifling of creativity as the result.

 

Title:  The 21st Century Classroom (Slide Presentation)

Author:  Laura Cusick

URL:  http://www.slideshare.net/lcusick/the-21st-century-classroom-8533728

Description:  This is a 19 slide presentation that discusses the conceptual understanding of a true 21st century classroom within the contextual framework of creativity.  Cusick defines creativity as 'belief+desire' but also discusses how, if harnessed properly, the tools of a 21st century classroom can create 'meaningful and critical thinking.'  What I find extremely useful are all of the links and references to modern technology tools that all of us can begin to learn to use in our own classrooms.  I've been using Jing and Moodle for quite a few years in my classroom now for online quizzing, discussion forums, and audio-recorded lectures for my students.  I am basically paperless now in my senior level British literature course, and Cusick's ideas and links are fabulous for all of us.  She has a good handle of what is current and new in social networking and technology and gives us at least a starting board for exploring new sites and resources for our classroom.  This wiki should provide those.  If the text doesn't hit some of these, this link is a great place to start.

 

8. Doug Thompson  

 

Title: Expanding Minds: Developing Creative Thinking in Young Learners

Author: Robert Fischer

URL: http://www.teachingthinking.net/thinking/web%20resources/robert_fisher_expandingminds.htm

 

    This site discusses the definition, benefits, and hindrances involved in promoting creativity in regards to young learners. The author describes creativity "generating outcomes that are original and of value." It explains a variety of ways that questioning and problem-solving activities can promote creativity in the classroom. The site also contains a resource of specific strategies and questions for stimulating creative ideas about common topics. There are also links to other resources available on the internet and available for purchase that could be useful to a classroom teacher.      

                                       

Title: Professional Development: Supporting Creativity in the Classroom

Author: Alice Sterling Honig... Site sponsored by: Scholastic

URL: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/professional-development-supporting-creativity-classroom

 

The Sponsor of this site defines creativity as "making new, sudden, and unexpected connections". It provides techniques that can be used to promote creative thinking. It identifies some challenges faced by teachers in the classroom in promoting and encouraging creativity. The author  also provides links to resources and literature that connect to the techniques, strategies, and topics discussed on the site.

 

9.  Gary Harvey 

 

Title:  Creative Encouragement for Adults and the Children That They Work With.

 

Sponsor or Author of the Website:  Jane (Last Name Unknown)

 

URL:  http://playfulminds.co.uk/

 

Description:  This site is meant for adults involved in teaching children creativity.  It contains blog entries ranging from Play and Creativity—Separate Things?  to Creators—Not Consumers.  After looking over the offerings and links on this site, I believe that it will be a valuable resource for future discussion. 

 

A powerful idea which jumped out at me in the blog was contained in the statement “We wanted them to know that their role in life was not to be passive consumers of others peoples thought”.   

 

This is a European perspective on creativity.  I chose this website to explore the different nuances in the approach to teaching creativity.

 

Definition of Creativity:  Imaginative activity fashioned to produce outcomes that are both original and of value. Creative processes have four characteristics. First, they always involve thinking or behaving imaginatively. Second, this imaginative activity is purposeful: that is, it is directed to achieve an objective. Third, these processes must generate something original. Fourth, the outcome must be of value in relation to the objective.

 

Title:  The Journey to Excellence

 

Sponsor or Author of the Website:  HM Inspectorate of Education

 

URL:  http://www.journeytoexcellence.org.uk/resourcesandcpd/research/summaries/rsfosteringcreativity.asp

 

Description:  This site addresses defining creativity, fostering creativity, refining creativity in the classroom and national implications.  The works of learning theorists are included here along with discussions of impact on creativity.  Creative meta-cognition is also discussed as well.  This is more of a general approach to excellence through creativity website as opposed to a detailed step by step analysis of methods and results.

 

www.journeytoexcellence.org.uk is another European perspective on creativity.  I chose this government backed website because of its quality and breadth of information.

 

Definition of Creativity:  This website never came out with a “hard” definition of creativity; instead building its definition around the following statements: 

 

 'I define creativity as the entire process by which ideas are generated, developed and transformed into value. It comprises what people commonly mean by innovation and entrepreneurship.John Kao, 1997

'Creativity is about liberating human energy.' Howard Gardner

'Creativity is the process of developing ideas that are original and of value.  Creative intelligence is dynamic, diverse and distinct.' Sir Ken Robinson 2001

10. Cassy Fowler

Title: Creativity at School: is it even possible?

Sponsor: Teaching Expertise

URL:  http://www.teachingexpertise.com/articles/creativity-school-714  

This website defines creativity as a creative way to respond to everyday situations or creativity when developing new ideas. This is useful because it gives a brief overview of creativity in the classroom and gives practical answers to questions asked by everyday teachers. It is a great “spring board” to use when diving into implementing creativity into the classroom. It lists pre-requisites needed to effectively implement creativity. Also, it compares creativity to schooling; it is interesting to see the differences side by side in the chart. After reading and getting a basic understanding on creativity in the classroom, there is a link that has many other websites that are more specific to different grade levels and subjects.  

Title: 22 Simple Ideas for Harnessing Creativity in the Elementary Classroom

Author: Trisha Riche

URL:  http://www.edutopia.org/blog/creativity-in-classroom-trisha-riche

Trish Riche defines creativity as innovation and thinking “outside the box”. She is an inclusion kindergarten teacher and was selected as one of the top ten most innovative educators in the country for The Great American Teach Off. She explains how important it is to incorporate creativity into the classroom. She gives different resources that teachers can use and explains that creativity is a time saver because students are more likely to retain the content and a teacher using creativity will not have to re-teach concepts.  She also lists twenty two activities to use in an elementary classroom. She encourages teachers to “live like a turtle.” She explains that you have to be willing to try new things and stick your neck out to make a difference.

 

 

 

1.  Charity Ady

 

Title: Enhancing Creativity in the Classroom

Author: Vernice James, Reena Lederman Gerald, Beate Vagt

https://projects .coe.uga.edu/epltt/index.php?title=Creativity

 

This website will allow you to explore the meaning of creativity.  You will also be bale to find ways to enhance creativity in the classroom and implications for teaching and learning. 

 

Definition: The production of both novel and appropriate work.

 

2. Charity Ady

 

Title: Creativity in the Classroom

Author: Rahul Thadani

www.buzzle.com/articles/creativity-in-the-classroom.html

 

This website talks about the importance of creativity in the classroom.  It gives ways of promoting creativity in the classroom.  There are also additional links on this website you can click on.  some are but not limited to.. Motivation in the classroom, Creative thinking and more  

 

Definition: Creativity: When students own ideas that are created within their own minds.

 

 

12. Marlene L King 

 

Title: Exquisite Minds: Gifted and Creative Children

Sponsor: Stacia N. Garland MEd., Educator  specializing in gifted and talented children

url: www.exquisite-minds.com

 

        This site is an “exquisite” site.  It provides resources for students, parents, and teachers. It does not provide a set definition of creativity, instead it promotes creativity. This site provides lesson plans for gifted and talented children based on creativity. The site includes articles, games, resources, examples, access to books about creativity. IT provides access to videos of prodigies in the news, psychology behind gifted children and testing and the role of creativity in the process. There initial statement is “Exquisite mind’s believes in the importance of cultivating creativity…” The site is designed to promote not only the gifted child but creativity in that child.

 

Title: Creativity in Young Children

Sponsor: Kids Source

url:http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content2/Creativity_in_kids.html

 

      This site provides many articles relating to creativity and children.  It also provides information about including creativity in the classroom.  It provides roughly six to seven articles relating to creativity from what it is to the effects of expressing creativity.  The site provides this definition of creativity “as the interpersonal and intrapersonal process by means of which original, high quality, and genuinely significant products are developed”. This site will help with the understanding of creativity and the information about implementation of it into the classroom.

 

 

 

Tiffany Huerster

 

Title: 7 Ways to Foster Creativity in your Kids

Author: Christine Carter

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/raising_happiness/post/7_ways_to_foster_creativity_in_your_kids/

 

This website explains ways for parents to foster creativity in their children. The sit explains that creativity is more of a talent than inborn nature and that parents can help their children to become more creative. The site suggests creating a play environment that fosters creativity by allowing children to participate in creative atmosphere, creative play, freedom, participation in the arts, allow children to form an opinion, stop rewarding creativity and also stop getting caught up in achievement rather than products.

 

Title: Creative Ways to Foster Creativity

Author: Carol Bainbridge

http://giftedkids.about.com/od/nurturinggiftsandtalents/a/creative.htm

 

 According to the article posted on the website, children are becoming less and less creative. This makes the children less able to solve problems as an adult. The researchers gave tests to young children to measure creativity. The tests have to deal with generating many ideas. During a longitudinal study, it has been shown that if children are creative at a young age they will remain creative when they get older. Creativity is not only present in the classrooms of young children but of older children also. 

 

 

Jennifer Schneider

 

Title: Teaching Creativity 2: Debunking the Mozart Myth

Author: Michele & Robert Root-Bernstein

www.psychologytoday.com/blog/imagine/200812/teaching-creativity-2-debunking-the-mozart-myth-0

 

Definition of creativity: "...creativity is never a single act.  Creativity is always a lengthy process requiring huge amounts of preparation and persistence."

 

What you'll find:

     The "Mozart myth" is the misconception that, like Mozart reportedly operated, creative people are born with talent that allows music and other products to simply "appear" overnight with little work.  The article follows "Sam" and his frustration with being unable to compose an encore to his chart-topping music hit, convinced that he suffers from a mental block and is, therefore, not creative as he thought.  The authors had taught a course at UCLA on creative process and "debunk" this myth about creativity and teaching creativity.

 

Title: Teaching Creativity in America's Schools

Author: Stephanie Susman

www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/2010/08/01/teaching-creativity-in-americas-schools/

 

Definition of creativity: "Creativity isn't just about art projects, it's about the thinking process students take to solve problems in all fields."

 

What you'll find:

     The author explores the progress that's been made in American schools since the signing of Bush's NCLB Act of 2001.  The article supports the idea that creativity is much more important than IQ, and that creative individuals are more likely to succeed than those who have high IQ but exhibit little "CQ" (creativity quotient).  It stresses the need for schools to improve their methods of fostering creativity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333802510/computer-kids.jpg

 

Technologically Gifted Child

 

Submitted by: Michael Shamblin

 

Cleveland State University

 

Dr. Susan Rakow

 

7 April 2012

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333802584/ComputerKid_tnb.png

 

Introduction

 

            This research paper will explore the topic of the technologically gifted child.  Very little research has been conducted on this topic within the last ten years.  It is a relatively new topic that must be considered in exploring another way to be gifted in the twenty first century.  The first evidence of computer programming date back to1938 when the first programmable computer was invented.  The Z1 was originally created by Germany’s Konrad Zuse in his parents living room in 1936 – 1938 this is considered to be the first electro-mechanical binary programmable computer and really the first functional computer  (When was the first computer invented?, 2012).  Gifts and talents come in different forms, and one area of talent must be technology.  Students who are gifted in technology may not be identified as gifted with using traditional identification methods.  Schools in the twenty first century need to not only prepare students to become effective users of technology, but they also need to begin to recognize students that possess strengths in technology. 

 

            Schools need to recognize and develop gifts beyond what have been traditionally identified for gifted and talented programs.  It is important to recognize technologically gifted students in order to develop their talent.  Friedman-Nimz and O’Brien commented on, “If computer technology is ignored as an area of talent, one might hypothesize that a noticeable group of high-potential students are not receiving needed services to develop their potential” (O’Brien, Firedman-Nimz, Lacey, & Denson, 2005).  This research paper will try to give a better understanding of the technologically gifted child and to answer the following questions, what are the different types of technology giftedness and how to properly identify a technologically gifted child?  A review of the literature or an organized description of the research will be reviewed.  In addition, this research paper will include a synthesis of the research including connections, insights, and scholarly divergent views and any insights, questions still unanswered or newly raised, and personal connections.

 

Review of the Literature

 

Types of Technology Giftedness

            Del Siegle is a professor in gifted education and Department Head of Educational Psychology in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut.  Del currently writes a technology column for Gifted Child Today.  Reva Friedman-Nimz has influenced Del’s thinking about technology giftedness.  Technology giftedness appears to manifest itself in three distinct ways.  First, the talent to write a computer code appears to be one type of technology giftedness.  A second area of giftedness involves the application of technology and these children are known as the interfacers.  The third area of technology giftedness involves those who enjoy working with technology equipment (Siegle, 2005).  O’Brien, Friedman-Nimz, Lacey, and Denson (2005) identified the first two groups of gifted technology students: programmers and interfacers.  Friedman-Nimz has since suggested the third group those who like to work with hardware and fix computers.  If students excel in each of these categories they can be considered to be technologically gifted.  “In addition to demonstrating expertise, these young people tend to exhibit passion toward one or more technology related activity” (Siegle, 2007, p.18). 

 

            Siegle had personally known academically gifted students that were able to begin exploring how to write computer code as early as first grade.  Some students he had noticed demonstrated a special talent with programming and others did not.  Programming for these students appeared to be a natural way of thinking and seeing the world.  Siegle suggest that it is important to expose young people to programming at an early age.  Older computer programs that were created for the Apple Computer or Atari BASIC were wonderful mediums to introduce programming in the early 1980’s.  Additionally, with the use of Visual BASIC since 1991 this has been used by students to create client applications on Windows.  Today, most educators are not aware but Microsoft has built a version of this into its Office products.  This will allow a start to more advanced programming for technologically gifted programming students.  O’Brien et.  al. (2005) found that programmers liked to work alone and students began using the computer as a toy or education tool.  Students start creating simple web pages and learn code that is more advanced.  Children also need to create web pages and this is a great start to programming as well.  The use of html, Java, and XML will need to follow from using simple web editing programs.  Children then can be further challenged with programming such as Visual BASIC, C++, or more advanced Java (Siegle, 2007).

 

            The second area of giftedness involves the application of technology.  These technologically gifted students excel in using software.  These students might not be able to program computers, but they can be creative with using software applications.  These students experiment with software applications and learn them without training (Siegle, 2004, p. 31).  These students not only limit themselves to computers, they may use audio and video technology as well.  O’Brien et al. (2005) found that these students were more into social interactions that resulted from helping others use technology.  These students may exhibit behaviors such as playing with technology with their free time, helping others with technology problems, able to incorporate a variety of technologies with their class assignments, and the excitement to use any new form of technology (Siegle, 2005).  The third area of technological giftedness involves those who enjoy working with technology equipment.  These students enjoy putting together a computer from spare or new parts, fixing a piece of technology hardware, or any other type of device (Seigle, 2007).  More recently Silverman had came across what seems like another type of technology giftedness that she calls “Technical Wizards” from the earliest moments of life (Silverman). 

 

            O’Brien et. al. (2005) discussed an effective study that was done to find out the first two types of technological giftedness.  The LearnGen Project purpose was to construct work groups consisting of field based and preservice teachers and K-12 students to learn new technology applications and new content.  A cohort was created to explore new ways to provide opportunities that are more authentic for high school students whose technology expertise challenged the district’s ability to provide fitting learning opportunities.  The cohort that was involved in this study focused on developing a website to supplement instruction for a graduate level gifted and talented class.  Conclusions had shown that students enjoyed the opportunity to learn and apply new skills to build a product that would be used in a real world setting.  Students reflected and expressed a desire to learn organizational and management skills and how to facilitate communication among several work groups.  One student felt that in the future, they could organize and distribute the work among more people.  In all, results of the project suggest that there are two subtypes of computer technology talent among adolescents: programming and interfacing. 

 

Properly Identifying a Technologically Gifted Child

            At this present time, a scale has been created that can help identify a technologically gifted interfacer.  The Scales for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of Superior Students includes a seven-item technology rating scale.  In studies in using this scale, teachers had identified more males than females with it.  Nugent (2001) proposed that teachers should provide girls with opportunities for play and open-ended exploration on the computer.  Nugent suggested that girls should have opportunities for girls’ computer clubs, girls only lunch, and after school periods for computer usage.  Additionally these activities will help girls gain confidence and comfort with the use of technology.  More effort is needed to find and encourage technologically gifted females in today’s society (Nugent, 2001).  Gifted students benefit from the use of technology.  Today’s teen is engulfed in a world full of information and media.  These students, whether or not they are talented in technology-specific fields, possess skills that enable them to maximize the use of current innovations (Sheffield, 2007). 

 

Synthesis of the Research

 

            The LearnGen study seemed to involve such a small number of high school students who had volunteered for a computer programming club-university joint project.  Before any generalizations can be made on the validity of this study, other age levels and school settings need to be explored further to refine profiles of high technology ability students.  The study did seem to identify the high ability programmer and interfacer.  In considering suggestions for teaching the technologically gifted child from this study, it is important to focus first on the interest and self-identified abilities of the students to shape program options, rather than relying on local resources such as teacher expertise and hardware/software availability.  In addition, teachers need to pay close attention to students that stay after school in the computer lab or continue to play with other technology devices, because they may need this information to help them to properly identify the technologically gifted child.

 

            Linda Silverman recently had come across what she calls “Technical Wizards.”  She feels that these children are the least likely to understand, or who we can deal with in schools.  Some children Silverman believes are natural technical wizards.  These technical wizards from the earliest moments of life are fascinated with mechanical objects and how things work.  Linda has seen several of these children that have come to the Gifted Child Development Center for testing.  A recent child that she came across who was tested at the age of five was able to draw a diode circuit and a transformer with a built in plug.  This young child’s sentence completion test said, “He thinks most about electronic circuits, dreams of electronic circuits and hates when his brother gets into his electronics and destroys them.”  Silverman suggested that to cope with a technical wizard such as this in the classroom or family, it was important to respect their passion and give them as many opportunities as possible to learn what they want to learn (Silverman). 

 

            In thinking about the types of technology giftedness that have been discussed, should Silverman’s classification of the technical wizard be placed as a new type of technological giftedness?  Silverman discussed that some parents have been concerned about the welfare of their technical wizards during early childhood.  One example, a mother wrote about her concerned technical wizard son to Linda Silverman.  At 2 years, 1 month, her son’s favorite gift was a Mickey Mouse calculator.  Her child would sit for an hour or more pressing buttons, adding and subtracting by one.  When her child was 2 ½ years old he was able to count to 100 forwards and from 100 to 0 backwards and then her child was able to start counting by 10’s.  Then clocks and gears entered his life and clocks were given as presents.  Her child wanted to know more about gears and was fascinated with seeing a car’s engine.  Questions arise with these technical wizards, are they born with this type of giftedness (nature), and then nurtured with objects and experiences that allow for them to strengthen this type of giftedness. 

 

            Siegle (2007) discussed how a technologically gifted fixer could have a positive impact on the lives of others.  Jacob Komar a nine-year-old child in 2001 noticed outdated and unused computers in his sister’s school.  With the help of his family, he started Computers for Communities (CFC).  This nonprofit organization accepts old computers, printers, etc. from individuals, schools, and businesses.  This group refurbishes and redistributes the equipment back to the community for the underprivileged.  Siegle identified a technology fixer that was able to develop a sense of prestige and accomplishment while at the same time this student was able to advance his giftedness.  Siegle suggested that to continue this talent, it was important to form after school clubs. 

 

Personal Insights and Connections

 

            I noticed that The United Kingdom features two types of computer talent design and technology http://www.data.org.uk/.  If in Great Britain computer technology is recognized as a talent, possibly this could lead into similar identification and programming in the United States.  When doing the research, a scale was created that seems to properly identify a gifted technologically interfacer, but what about the creation of other effective tools to identify the technical wizard, the programmer, or the computer fixer.  When thinking about the technical wizard how can you cope with this wizard in the classroom or family.  I believe as Silverman had suggested that it is important to give them as many opportunities as possible to learn what they want to learn.  Is it possible to educate these students to the fullest of their academic potential?  Several schools can best suit these immersion learners in which the curriculum is designed around the child’s interest; in which reading, spelling, creative writing, mathematics are brought together into the study of computers, etc.  I believe with Silverman that computer-assisted instruction and interactive computers can be used as tools to educate these students.  I disagree in how Silverman suggested that these tools are the most effective because children need to learn effective communication skills as well. 

 

            We are leading into a society in which websites such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and the use of technology devices such as the cell phone etc. are becoming the norm in how to communicate in the twenty first century.  Cross (2004) noted that social and emotional development of gifted children is clearly being affected by the use of communication technologies.  Yes, I believe with Silverman that not all children are people persons and some are much more comfortable with the world of objects, but how in fact can they become our technical leaders without developing social skills as well.  For example, if a child creates a new software application or piece of hardware that somehow becomes a part of our daily lives, how then can this child effectively describe and present this new creation to others socially.  Yes, you can do this electronically or through someone else, but this child will become the spotlight for interviews and discussions, and socially they will need to communicate their creations. 

 

            I do believe that technologically gifted students do need to have their gifts recognized and nurtured.  This may require someone that has more of a technological expertise rather than the classroom teacher or gifted intervention specialist unless if they have these skills.  Technological talent cannot be developed if schools lack new and updated hardware and software applications.  Schools need advanced technologies so that technologically gifted students can develop to their fullest potential.  How can this be done with the budget cuts and lack of funding for many school districts in today’s society?  Schools may need to provide elementary students access to their middle or high school computer hardware and software applications.  School districts need to continue to collaborate and communicate with local colleges so that their students can use their laboratories as well.  Administrators in school districts today need to find ways to reach to the community to find mentors and resources as well. 

 

            In addition, my recommendations for gifted teachers are to create a personal technology improvement plan (PTIP).  Many obstacles are faced with gifted teachers today in integrating technology into the curriculum: access to resources and continuous professional development.  It is important for gifted teachers to take time to evaluate their ability to integrate technology into the gifted education classroom.  Gifted students want to use computer hardware and software applications as a learning tool in schools today.  By creating a PTIP, gifted intervention specialist can evaluate their current ability to integrate technology into the curriculum, and help to ascertain the best method for improving their skills (Besnoy, 2007). 

 

Conclusion

 

            This paper tried to give a better understanding of the technologically gifted child and to answer the following questions, what are the different types of technology giftedness and how to properly identify a technologically gifted child?  Reva Friedman-Nimz has influenced Del Siegle’s thinking about technology giftedness.  Technology giftedness appears to manifest itself in three important ways.  The talent to write computer code, the application of technology, and those who enjoy working with technology equipment.  Siegle discusses how as early as first grade he has known students that have begun exploring how to write computer code.  Another type that I believe needs to be added within these categories is the technical wizard gifted child and this specific type needs to be studied in greater detail.  The technical wizard as Silverman discusses appears to be the child who within the earliest moments of life are fascinated with mechanical objects and how things work.  In fact, I believe four categories of identifying the technologically gifted child exists. 

 

            Additionally, identifying the technologically gifted child with little tools is a big challenge.  I believe that gifted teachers need to definitely work on an effective personal technology improvement plan and parents need to identify any possible early signs of the technical wizard child along with the ability of early computer programming.  Teachers will need to work on strengthening the application of technology for students in the classroom along with properly identifying the students that use technology hardware and software and apply this in advanced and creative ways.                                                                                                            

 

            The appendix section of my research paper will provide teachers with a sample scale for rating the behavioral characteristics of superior students to identify various technology characteristics.  In addition, an example personal technology improvement plan is provided as well to help teachers to further enrich their current technology skills and to provide a classroom that is rich in technology.

 

 

 

References

 

 

            Besnoy, K. (2007). Creating A Personal Technology Improvement Plan For Teachers of the Gifted. Gifted Child Today, 44-49.

 

Cross, T. L. (2004). Technology and the Unseen World of Gifted Students. Gifted Child Today, 14-15, 63.

 

            Nugent, S. A. (2001). Technology and the gifted: Focus, facets, and the future.  Gifted Child Today, 24(4), 38-45.

 

            O’Brien, B., Firedman-Nimz, R., Lacey, J., & Denson, D. (2005). From Bits and Bytes to C++ and Web Sites: What is Computer Talent Made of? Gifted Child Today, 56-64.

 

            Sheffield, C. C. (2007). Technology and the Gifted Adolescent: Higher Order Thinking, 21st Century Literacy, and the Digital Native. Retrieved March 1, 2012, from Meridian: http://www.ncsu.edu/meridian//sum2007/gifted/index.htm

 

            Siegle, D. (2004). Identifying Students With Gifts and Talents in Technology. Gifted Child Today, 30-33, 64.

 

            Siegle, D. (2005). Gifted Students & Technology: An Interview with Del Siegle. Retrieved March 1, 2012, from Center for Talent Development: http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu/resources/displayArticle/?id=158

 

            Siegle, D. (2007). Identifying and Developing Technological Giftedness. Gifted Education Communicator, 18-21.

 

  Silverman, L. (n.d.). Technical Wizards. Denver: Gifted Development Center.

 

            When was the first computer invented? (2012). Retrieved February 6, 2012, from Computer Hope: http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000984.htm

 

 

Appendix A

Scales for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of Superior Students

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333802846/scales%20example%204.JPG 

 

 

Appendix B

Personal Technology Improvement Plan

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1333802860/technology%20plan.JPG 

 

 

 

 

Professional Development Module Assignment

 

 Shamblin Michael Professional Development Module UPDATED.pdf

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans and More for Gifted and Talented Students (Examples)

 

(Click on the Link to view and download the various as assignments for EGT 512 Nature and Developmental Needs, EGT 513 Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, EGT 517 Creativity, Inquiry, and Productive Thinking, EGT 518 Working with Students, Families, and Professionals and EGT 580 Practicum.

  

 

Unit Plan on the Ohio and Erie Canal EGT 513

 

7 lesson plans using various strategies EGT 517

 

Focused Investigation Research Paper with Research and Personal Experiences in Educating Students with Computer Technology (EGT 513 Curriculum, Teaching Strategies, Differentiated Instruction and Evaluations)

 

Shamblin District Needs Assessment.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin District vs NAGC Comparison Form.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin Michael WEP FINAL.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin Michael Advocacy.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin_Michael_Philosophy Revised.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Case Study.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Torrance_Test.pdf EGT 517

 

Shamblin_Michael_Creative Problem Solving Lesson.pdf EGT 517

 

Shamblin_Michael_Aha_Solution.pdf EGT 517

 

Shamblin_Michael_Excellence v. Equity.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Arent All Children Gifted.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Asynchronous Development.pdf EGT 512

 

InteractiveFamilyPrograms Cleveland Schools.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Identification_Assessment.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Discover Assessment.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Diversity.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Special Needs.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin_Michael_Parents.pdf EGT 512

 

Shamblin Michael HQPD.pdf EGT 518

 

ShamblinMichaelIdealvsReality.pdf EGT 518

 

Gifted Policy Cleveland School District.pdf EGT 512

 

Assessment Instruments Cleveland Schools.pdf EGT 512

 

History of Gifted Education.pdf

 

Early signs of giftedness.pdf EGT 512

 

Books on Differentiation

 

Shamblin Michael Cognitive and Affective.pdf EGT 512

 

The diverse profile of the extremely gifted child.pdf EGT 512

 

How Do I Differentiate Instruction to Meet Needs of All Learners.pdf EGT 512 and 517

 

Shamblin_Michael_Wiki Assignment Freud.pdf EGT 517

 

Interpersonal.pdf EGT 517

 

Shamblin_Michael_Creativity.pdf EGT 512

 

Guilford.pdf EGT 517

 

ShamblinMichaelViewfromSatLessonPlan.pdf EGT 513

 

ShamblinMichaelChoiceBoardViewfromSatRedo.pdf EGT 513

 

ShamblinMichaelViewfromSatPreTest-2.pdf EGT 513

 

Shamblin Michael Crazy Parent.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin Michael Advocacy SUPT.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin_Role Playing Assignment Cooperative Learning.pdf EGT 512

 

HildaTabaTeachngStrategies.pdf EGT 517

 

HB_555_Changes_to_Gifted.pdf EGT 580

 

Alternative Assessment Strategies.pdf EGT 580

 

Application for Menlo Park Academy School Computer Club.pdf EGT 580

 

Gifted Stereotype.pdf EGT 580

 

Integrating multicultural and gifted education.pdf EGT 580

 

K-12 programming standards.pdf EGT 518

 

Standard 3 K2 Academic and Affective Characteritics and learnng needs.pdf EGT 518

 

Shamblin Parent Letter Prezi.pdf

 

EGT 580 ShamblinGiftedLesson1.pdf

 

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359638518/multicultural-gifted-education%20book.jpg

 

http://mrshamblin.pbworks.com/f/1359638544/parenting%20gifted%20children.JPG

 

 

 

 

Gifted Resources

 

Links to other Gifted Sites

 

PBWorks or Wikispace Gifted Sites

 

http://gifted-talented.pbworks.com/w/page/8691847/CESA%205%20Gifted%20and%20Talented

https://thinkingoutsidethebox.pbworks.com/w/page/22188082/FrontPage

http://idmforgifted.pbworks.com/w/page/27925465/FrontPage

https://hillegifted.wikispaces.com/

 

Other Gifted Sites

 

http://www.oagc.com/ Ohio Association for Gifted Children

http://www.oagc.com/resources.asp Gifted Resources Ohio Association for Gifted Children (Gifted Links, Mailing List, Gifted Rule and Law for the state of Ohio etc.)

 

National/International Organizations

 

 

Gifted Education News

 

 

Resources for Parents

(SOME LINKS HAVE BEEN ADDED THROUGHOUT THE PAGE)

 

Smart Board Games (Hoagies' Gifted Education Page) http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/smart_board_games.htm 

48 Essential Links for the Parents of Gifted Children http://oedb.org/ilibrarian/50-essential-links-for-the-parents-of-gifted-children/  

Gifted Education Resources for Students, Parents and Teachers
Compilation of links to resources on all subjects and topics. 
http://guest.portaportal.com/anneflick
National Society for the Gifted & Talented Gifted & Talented Education Resources
Listing of national and state associations, and links to articles. 
http://www.nsgt.org/resources/index.asp

The Young Gifted Child: A Guide for Families, Ohio Department of Education.  http://www.oagc.com/files/YGChild_Web%5B1%5D.pdf

Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted
Focused on developing the mental health and social competence of gifted people. 
http://www.sengifted.org/ 

Ohio Association for Gifted Children
Listing of resources for parents and students.  
http://www.oagc.com/?q=links

National Association for Gifted Children
Contains links and resources for parents and educators.  
http://www.nagc.org/

Association for the Education of Gifted Underachieving Students
Compilation of links to sites of interest.  
http://www.aegus1.org/links.html

NEOGEAR
Listing of websites and recommended reading. 
https://sites.google.com/site/neogearorg/resources

Great Potential Press Guiding Gifted Children and Adults (browse through books to purchase, gifted links and much more) http://www.greatpotentialpress.com/ 

The Young Gifted Child: A Guide for Families http://kingofalltechnology.com/youngchildgifted.pdf

 

 

Summer Camps and Enrichment Opportunities in Greater Cleveland Ohio (NEW)

 

Summer Opportunities for Gifted/Talented Students (OAGC)
Listing of opportunities in Ohio, by region.

Math Monkey
Summer enrichment classes include robotics, math exploration, and general academics. 

iD Tech Camps at Case Western
Computer camps for students interested in video game design, programming, mobile app development, web design, video editing, animation, etc.

 Problem-Solving Institute
Day camp for kids 12-17 covers risk management, pattern recognition, logic, probability, physics, and puzzles. 

Cleveland Institute of Art Young Artist Classes 
Wide variety of classes including drawing, painting, ceramics, and jewelry making.

Great Lakes Science Center Summer Camps  
Wizard Science, Dissection Discovery, Crazy Chemistry, Awesome Astronauts, etc. Biomedical technology robotics, marine biology and aerospace technology for kids entering grades 9-12.

Olmsted Performing Arts Daycamps
Acting, singing, and dancing camp, as well as a fine arts camps.

Funuation Tekademy Technology Camps
Electronics, robotics, 2D and 3D video game design, stop-motion animation, digital audio production, Java, and iPhone app development.

Cleveland Museum of Natural History Summer Camps 
Junior Medical Camps include pre-med, forensics, medical and veterinary camps. Circle Sampler Camps show off the scientific, artistic, musical, theatrical and cultural institutions around University Circle.

Classroom Antics Tech Camps
Video game design, stop-motion animation, LEGO robotics, and Scratch computer programming. 

The Beck Center for the Arts Summer Camps
Dance, music, theater, and visual arts camps.

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo day camps
Crafts, zoo tours, get-close encounters with small animals, etc. 

Tri-C Youth Summer Camps http://www.tri-c.edu/youth-programs/youth-summer-camps/index.html
Technology, martial arts, visual arts, extreme science, mystery solving, dance, art, fashion design, photography, archaeology, and young entrepreneurs camps. 

 

CONTEST for Gifted..

http://www.mathcounts.org/ MATHCOUNTS FOUNDATION http://www.noetic-learning.com/mathcontest/ This contest is for grades 2-8.

 

 

Challenging Websites for Gifted and Talented Students

 

A Different Place

BrainBashers

Critical Thinking Fun

Gifted Students Save the World

Gifted Students Solve Mysteries

Make Your Own Comics!

SET Game Online

Story Starters

Vocabulary Building Site

Words, Words, Words

Daily Buzzword http://www.wordcentral.com/buzzword/buzzword.php

Daily Buzzword Archive http://www.wordcentral.com/buzzword/archive.php

SuperKids Vocab Builders http://www.superkids.com/aweb/tools/words/wod.shtml

Merriam Webster Word of the Day http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/

http://phrontistery.info/

http://teacher.scholastic.com/Mathhunt/index.asp Math Hunt Activities

http://www.hoodamath.com/ Math Games

http://www.basherbooks.com/usa/games.html

http://school.discoveryeducation.com/brainboosters/ Brain Boosters

https://giftedandtalented.com/challenge-zone

 

 

 

Gifted Education Websites for Teachers, Parents, Etc.

 

Gifted and Talented Children’s Resources  http://altinvesthq.com/edu/gifted-and-talented/ How can you extend a gifted and talented child? Just one of the many
 questions answered in this educational resource.

NAGC invests all of its resources to train teachers, encourage parents and educate administrators and policymakers on how to develop and support gifted children and what's at stake if high-potential learners are not challenged and encouraged.

http://www.nagc.org/ 

Since 1952, The Ohio Association for Gifted Children has been working with families and educators to promote the best interest of gifted children.

http://www.oagc.com/ 

Hoagies' Gifted Education Page offers resources, articles, books and links for Parents, for Educators, Counselors, Administrators and other Professionals, and for Kids & Teens.

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/ 

SENG is dedicated to fostering environments in which gifted adults and children, in all their diversity, understand and accept themselves and are understood, valued, nurtured, and supported by their families, schools, workplaces, and communities.

http://www.sengifted.org/

Education search engine compiling information from government, university and non-commercial sources. Initial results appear in the right-hand pane, while narrowed results are grouped under subheadings in the left-hand pane.

http://education.iseek.com/iseek/info.html?view=education.about 

This national report, sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation, illustrates the discrepancy between research on acceleration and acceleration beliefs and practices commonly utilized in education today. You may download a copy of the report or request a free print copy at this site.

http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Nation_Deceived/Get_Report.aspx 

http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/

The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) has compiled these text and PDF descriptions of research studies conducted by NRC/GT. They explain the most defensible practices for implementation based on research evidence.

http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/nrcgt/nrconlin.html#02152 

The Davidson Institute for Talent Development offers this free service for educators and other professionals dedicated to helping gifted learners. Learn where you state ranks in gifted policy. Access staff development, lesson plans, newsletters and much more.

http://www.davidsongifted.org/edguild/ 

Students, parents, and educators can pinpoint a wealth of gifted information at this site with easy search capabilities for articles, resources, and state policy pages.

http://www.DavidsonGifted.org/DB

 

http://www.sde.com/teacher-resources.asp Looking for additional resources, classroom strategies, or fun activities? Why not start here. Take a moment to browse through the sites listed. You may find just what you’re looking for.

 

http://differentiationcentral.com/

 

http://javits.escco.org/

 

http://mensaforkids.org/school_template.cfm?showPage=school_lesson_plan.cfm Lesson Plans  or try this link http://www.us.mensa.org/learn/gifted-youth/lesson-and-activity-plans/lesson-plans/  

 

http://www.eds-resources.com/edgifted.html Lesson Plans and Resources

 

http://www.techlearning.com/web-tour/0080/resources-for-teaching-the-gifted-and-talented/45109 Resource Links (some not working)

 

http://metagifted.org/products/enrichmentProjectList/

 

http://www.medina-esc.org/GiftedServices1.aspx Medina County Schools Educational Service Center

 

http://enrichmentforadvancedstudents.weebly.com/

http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/

 

 

 


 

 

Gifted Websites for 4th-5th Grade (links courtesy of Mrs. Edwards)

4th Grade Math!

 

 

Line Plot guided learning game

 

 

Creating line plots

 

 

 

Fraction Line Plots

 

Geometry

 

Use the links below to help you practice and extend your understanding of geometry.

 

 

Geometry Menu of Games on Sheppard Software

 

 

2D Shape Concentration

 

 

 

Hidden Picture Geometry

 

 

Quadrilateral Quest

 

 

 

Quadrilateral Shape Game

 

 

Fun Brain Perimeter

 

 

 

Area and Perimeter of Rectangles

 

 

Perimeter Explorer

 

 

 

Geometry Song Lyrics

 

 

Geometry Learning Games

 

 

Math Dictionary for Kids

 

 

Fun Brain Shape Surveyor

 

 

 

Math-Play Geometry Games

 

 

Online Geoboard

 

 

 

Collection of Kids' Math Games

 

Fractions

 

Use the links below to practice and extend your learning of fractions.
 

 

 

Fraction Fling

 

 

Fresh Baked Fractions

 

 

 

Fraction Game Menu on Sheppard Software

 

Multiplication and Division

 

Use the links below to practice and extend your learning of multiplication and division.

 

 

 

Division Facts

 

 

Division with Remainders

 

 

 

Long Division Number Monster

 

 

Division Tic-Tac-Toe

 

 

 

Quia Math Journey

 

 

Division Practice Menu on Sheppard Software

 

 

Multiplication Game Menu- Sheppard Software

 

 

 

Multiply 3 digits by 1 digit numbers

 

 

Multiply 2 digit by 1 digit numbers

 

 

 

Multiply 2 digit by 2 digit numbers

 

Place Value

 

Use the links below to practice and extend your understanding of large number place value.

 

 

 

Guess the Number

 

 

Base 10 Fun

 

 

 

Interactive 100 Chart

 

 

Comparing Number Values

 

 

 

Place Value Puzzler

 

 

Place Value Hockey

 

 

 

Place Value Game Menu- Sheppard Software

 

 

Rounding Sheppard Software Game Menu

 

 

 

Rounding Quia Math Journey

 

Addition and Subtraction

 

Use the links below to practice and extend your learning of addition and subtraction of whole numbers.

 

 

Addition Game Menu- Sheppard Software

 

 

Drop Sum

 

 

 

Clear it Addition

 

 

Math Bingo

 

 

 

Math Lines

 

 

Sudoku

 

 

 

Subtraction Game Menu- Sheppard Software

 

5th Grade Math!

Order of Operations
 

 

Use the links below to practice and extend your understanding of order of operations.

 

 

Order of Operations Enrichment Games

 

 

Order of Operations Match

 

 

 

PEMDAS Blaster

 

 

Order of Operations Royal Rescue

 

 

Order of Operations Four

 

Geometry

 

Use the links below to practice and extend your understanding of geometry.

 

 

Quadrilateral Quest

 

 

Quadrilateral Shape Game

 

 

 

Area of Triangles

 

 

Coordinate Grid Game

 

 

 

Perimeter Explorer

 

 

Hidden Picture Geometry

 

 

Calculate Perimeter on Fun Brain

 

 

2D Shape Concentration

 

 

 

Geometry Game Menu- Sheppard Software

 

Decimals

 

Students can practice and extend their understanding of decimals by playing the games below.

 

 

Decimals of the Caribbean-Place Value

 

 

Decimal Place Value Pirates

 

 

 

Converting Decimals and Fractions to Percents Hundredaire!

 

 

Decimal Jeopardy- Decimals, Fractios, & Percents

 

 

 

Decimal Jeopardy using the 4 operations

 

 

Decimal Place Value Football

 

 

 

Decimals on a Number Line Mathman

 

 

Matchig Math Decimals-Hundreths

 

 

 

Matching Math Decimals-Tenths

 

 

Fruit Splat Convert Fractios to Decimals

 

 

 

Balloon Pop Decimal Patterns

 

 

Scooter Quest Decimal Rouding

 

 

 

Scooter Quest Decimal Place Value

 

 

Balloon Pop Order Decimals

 

 

 

Fruit Splat Compare Decimals

 

Fractions
 

 

Students can practice and extend their understanding of fractions by playing the games below. 

 

 

Fraction Game Menu on Sheppard Software

 

 

Adding Fractions

 

 

 

Subtracting Fractions

 

 

Multiplying Fractions

 

 

 

Dividing Fractions

 

 

Convert Mixed to Improper

 

 

Convert Improper to Mixed

 

Multiplication and Division

 

Students can play the games below to review, practice, and enrich their understanding.

 

 

 

Division Tic Tac Toe

 

 

Long Division Number Monster

 

 

 

Multiply & Divide Math Journey

 

 

Divide with Remainders

 

 

 

Two digit by Two digit Multiplication

 

Fact Fluency

      
 

Use the links below to practice your facts at school or at home.

Quizlet
Students can make their own flashcards or study from a set that is already created. This site is good for learning new vocabulary words in math and other content areas.

AAA Math

Quia Math Journey

 

Enrichment Math Links

 

 

The links below are math resources to enrich students in math.

Continental Math

Stella's Stunners

GCCTM

NRICH

 

 

Geometry Project Links
 

 

 

 

 

Geometry References

 

 

Math.com

 

 

 

Math Warehouse

 

 

Math Open Reference

 

 

 

KWL Creator

 

 

Reading

 

The Survival Guide for Parents of Gifted Kids

 

 

Gifted Kids Survival Guide- Ages 10 and Younger

 

 

 

 

Scholastic Book Wizard

Find books according to reading level or genre.

http://www.scholastic.com/bookwizard/

 

Starting Book Clubs for Kids

http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/parent-child/start-book-club-kids

 

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-tips/how-to-start-a-book-club-for-kids/

 

http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/activities-projects/start-your-book-club-30289.html

 

Book Report Alternatives

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/classroom-activities-25-book-report-alternatives

 

Reading Enrichment Resources for Gifted Students

Junior Great books are available for reading enrichment in grades K-5.

http://www.greatbooks.org/